Hey there Next-Gen: the disc is here to stay

Posted on 2/23/2014 by with 0 comments

Hey there Next-Gen: the disc is here to stay

Next-GenXbox One console with its controller and Kinect / Marcus Vetch

The newest wave of next-generation consoles recently hit the shelves and with them, a promise of an all-digital future.  Microsoft and Sony both talk about a tomorrow where your consoles will be seamlessly connected to the web, constantly downloading your music, movies and games from the cloud for your personal enjoyment.

Someday yes.  But let’s face it, the reality of an all-digital, always-online future is still a ways off into the future– Microsoft had to drop its requirement of connecting your Xbox One to the internet once a day because of massive public backlash.  Yes, digital downloading is as easy as ever and there now there is always the option of downloading a game directly from the internet, but the game disc will still remain.  Here’s why:

•    Digital release prices still remain high:  By going digital, console game publishers have cut down on their distribution costs, yet that release day copy of that newest game everyone is talking about will still cost you plenty.  You would think that the big game companies would lower their prices after saving money by going digital.  Well, this is not the case.

•    The used games market:  Speaking of price, used game discs provide lower costs that are especially important to gamers nowadays.  Remember how the Xbox One was originally designed to restrict how used games were being traded and an overwhelming negative response made them drop the restrictions?

•    Special real-world content:  People still love getting special content for their pre-order and collectors editions.  Those bonus posters, tokens, figurines, maps or whatever may come in your special edition mean a lot to followers of a franchise. (you can have a link to your products here)

•    Having it in your hands:  Let’s face it, much like the music vinyls and game cartridges of the past, people like being able to feel their games in their hands, have those boxes neatly stacked on shelves or CD racks so that they can see their game collection.

The reality is that we’re in a transition period between having games in physical and digital formats.  It’s like the transition between cartridges and discs, there’s going to be a period when both are being produced and used by everyone and anyone.  We see this now with special edition boxed sets include a code for digital bonus downloads but with the disc still containing the main game.
Sure there will come a time where I’ll be able to download my Battlefield 10 Collectors Edition copy for £10 while my 3-D printer prints out my exclusive collectibles, but until that time comes, discs are here to stay.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

« Back home